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Call Me Nuts If You Like—There’s More to Stephen King than Horror

May was Stephen King month for my reading diversion!

You might ask (and rightfully so) why thrillers and horror would attract a women's fiction writer. 

It starts with, "Once Upon a Time, a women's fiction writer read Stephen King's Writing: A Memoire of the Craft, which led (horror of horrors) to reading his first novel, which led to reading his last novel . . .

 

Read the reviews and then the books—if you dare.

 

May 13, 2021

Review of On Writing: A Memoire of the Craft – 5 stars

Just finished this great read! What a storyteller. The first part of the book is the memoir of the author's early days--I enjoyed this so much and found myself laughing out loud with many passages. I could so relate! The early memoir laid the groundwork for the rest--What is Writing, The Toolbox, and On Writing. Too many words of encouragement and insight to quote. And the book lists: POW! A real gem. Thank you! 

 

May 17, 2021

Review of Carrie by Stephen King – 5 stars

For me, this was more than a thriller or horror fiction—it is a story whose bedrock is about bias. The author connected the plot by artfully playing on implicit prejudices—biases about difference, privileged teenagers, people in privileged positions (Chris' father), religion, and bad boys, to name a few. The character development of Sue, Rita Desjardins, Tommy, and Henry Grayle, who were able to put themselves into the "other's" shoes, were takeaways and learning lessons . . . but in the end, predispositions overruled knee-jerk reactions and judgment, including those of the main character. The intermingling of dialog, inner dialog, news clippings, letters, interviews, and court proceedings with the third person POV was a strategy that kept the story fresh.

 

June 1, 2021

Review of Later by Stephen King – 5 Stars

Relationships!  It's all about relationships between parent and child, lovers, siblings, and of course, a psychopath who intrudes and tries to commandeer the life of the story's narrator.   As with other King novels, this is more than a crime thriller or horror story.  The relationship between a single mother and son with its ups and downs rings authentic and beautifully told. The conflict between lovers and the sorrow of lies and betrayal is another facet ripped from everyday life. Extracting the paranormal dimension, the primary antagonist is familiar to any reader who has encountered or lived with an abuser and narcissist. 

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Use Writer’s Block to Recharge Your Creativity

I recently answered a question on Goodreads, "How do you deal with writer's block?"

 

There are myriad definitions of writer's block, but Merriam-Webster probably has it right—a psychological inhibition preventing a writer from proceeding with a piece.  I think we all have experienced writer's block one time or another that invokes irritation, frustration, exasperation, and even conjures up an inner critic who is ready to heap tons of self-blame on us.

 

When I get writer's block, I see it as an opportunity to clear my mind, and I push that frustration and inner critic to the side and take a minute.  Writer's block is my brain telling me it is overloaded—it needs a rest; it needs a small retreat.  I call it the mindful minute. 

 

The mindful minute can take various forms.  Sometimes it is just sitting, taking a deep breath, closing my eyes, and being with myself and just listening!  Listening to the sounds around me, being curious about them, and not judging whether they are good or bad.  When extraneous thoughts come to mind, I acknowledge them and then gently push them away and go back to listening.  Other times, it is sitting, taking a breath, closing my eyes, and focusing on my emotions.

 

So, when I hit a writer's block, I look at it as an opportunity to recharge my creativity. I take a mindful minute (or maybe two or three).  Afterward, I write down my feelings about the experience in my writer's journal, and my creativity is awakened its flow breaks through the writer's block.  Here are examples of my "in the minute" journal entries:

 

9/13/2020:  In the minute listening:  Although I cannot see them, I can hear and visualize the piano keys in deliberate slowness moving up and down, producing the clearest of sounds.  What beat is that, I ask? Whole notes, half notes?  What does it feel like to be a piano key moving in that purposeful order?

 

9/14/2020:  In the minute smiling:  Feel what happens when you smile:  I smiled, and tranquility came over me, and I felt I as if I were floating on air.  I felt at peace.  I felt that nothing else mattered except being in this moment of calm.

 

See writer's block as an opportunity to recharge creativity!

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